Flash Friday – Quick to Forget


For a couple of weeks the phone calls and cards expressed sympathies. Then as suddenly as death itself, they stopped. For the next year, things reminded me of her; a favorite song on the radio or someone would cook a dish she liked. Now, I only remember her twice a year. On her birthday I tweet she would’ve been 104. I wish her a happy birthday in Heaven. As if they had birthdays in Heaven. On the anniversary of her death I post on Facebook how I miss her and quickly scroll on to the next newsfeed.
Oh look…tiny goats.

Aunt Sadie’s Ponderings

 

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I understand that back in the 50’s when I was but a child, all we had to worry about in school was “Run Jane run.” and did 1+1=2.  By the time we’d finished school, most of us had already been working for a couple years and credit cards were practically non-existent. So we had to take life in little bites or we never got the chance to eat at all.

Yet, in this modern fast paced society we’ve let ‘instant gratification’ become the mantra for, not just the young generation, but for even us old fogies. It seems our attention spans are becoming increasingly shorter as technology pushes us farther into the future.  We’re constantly being bombarded by hundreds of minuscule texts on our phones. The newsfeed on our social media sites like Facebook, Twitter and Instagram fly by us with the speed of light. Hell, most people have already given up on this post and moved on to something else because it’s too long.

I saw a television commercial the other day that told me “I want it all and I want it now.” So it’s little wonder that in the store the other day a mother was telling her 5 year old that she couldn’t have a toy because she didn’t have enough money. The child replied, “You can just put it on a credit card.” These are the lessons we’re teaching our children.

Seriously folks, as you travel through life things like getting married, having kids, buying a new car and a house is a mouthful to have to chew all at once. So let’s not try to cram it in all at once’ just heed ole Aunt Sadie’s advice and take the time to savor the taste of each bite a little before you have to swallow.

 

 

 

 

Happy Mother’s Day Moms

I’ve said this a thousand times and still I can never say it enough. Being a mother is the hardest and most thankless job there is and yet they do it for free.

In my mother’s eyes, “the needs of the family would always outweigh the needs of the one.” After all the bills were paid, the groceries bought and safely stored away in their larders, you might see her in the store, eyeing that new dress, or new pair of shoes or whatever items that she would have like to have. She would even go so far as to pick it up, turn it over in her hands and possibly even put it in her cart. But by the time she left the store, it would still be setting on the shelf. Because, in her words she could get by with what she had. Besides, one of the kids might need something between now and next payday.

I think that most mothers are pretty much the same. So this is why we have a special day set aside just for them. So pick up the phone, give them a call. They don’t want fancy presents or flowers. They just want you to tell them you love them.

Trust me one day you’ll wake up and find that there’s no phones in heaven.

 

Maybe there are some things that can be left unsaid. But, I love you, is not it.

When I was young my parents told me that I would wish I had this time to live again. I have to say that I thought they were a bit senile. Who in their right mind would want to live with no TV, cell phone or Facebook? Who wants to fish in clean water, breathe unpolluted air, or play in the middle of the street without harm? Who needs to sleep through a silent night or wake early to play in dew covered grass? Who needs simplicity, friends …family? Why would I long to hug my father, to kiss my mother’s brow, to tell my brothers and sisters I love them.

“Not me,” said the ignorance of youth.